Navy Reenlistment

Reenlisting in the military has many of the same requirements as those joining the US military for the first time. The US Navy's enlistment requirements should be looked at, but there are some important differences for those with prior service in the Navy or another branch of the US military. US Navy and Marine Corps vets are considered NAVETs and have slightly different requirements than Other Service Veterans (OSVETs).

Age

There is no minimum age, but applicants must be able to complete 20 years of active duty before they turn 60 years old. The maximum "computed" age for reenlistment into the Navy is 40 years old.

Education

Prior service applicants who hadn't earned a high school diploma before their first time in service are credited with having earned one upon reenlisting - as long as their prior service was for four or more years.

ASVAB/AFQT

If you reenlist into a job of the same rating as what you worked in your prior enlistment, prior service recruits can enlist using the AFQT score from their last ASVAB evaluation. If switching to a job in a different rating, then that person will need to take the ASVAB again and use the new line score to qualify.

Physical Fitness

All prior service recruits (other than those that have only been out of active duty for less than 6 months) must undergo physical evaluation at MEPS. You will be physically evaluated based on accession standards.

Height (rounded up to nearest inch)Men (maximum weight in pounds)Women (maximum weight in pounds)
57127127
58131131
59136136
60141141
61145145
62150149
63155152
64160156
65165160
66170163
66170163
67175167
68181170
69186174
70191177
71196181
72201185
73206189
74211194
75216200
76221205
77226211
78231216
79236222
80241227

If your weight exceeds the maximum weight for your height, you will then be checked to ensure you don't exceed the maximum allowable body fat limit - 22% for men and 33% for women.

Criminal History

Navy veteran applicants with offenses committed and waived prior to their initial US Navy enlistment do not require a new conduct waiver. Offenses committed during active duty do not require a conduct waiver if the offense was adjudicated by military or civilian authority. While waivers are not required, all offenses still need to be disclosed and annotated in the reenlistment paperwork.

Any offense or drug involvement since the last period of honorable service does require a conduct waiver. In this situation, not only will the recent offense be considered, but all offenses in the past will be a part of the evaluation.

Other Service veteran applicants will require a new waiver for any offenses waived when they enlisted in the other military branches. Consideration will be given to when the offense happened in relation to the applicant's prior service.